• wehadfacesthen:

    Kim Novak and James Stewart in Bell, Book and Candle (Richard Quine, 1958)

    via willywains:

    Novak summons up one memory that still touches her, on almost llama-worthy level. She tells of a quiet moment with Jimmy Stewart on the set of Bell, Book and Candle, the film they made together immediately after Vertigo. “It was,” she says, her husky voice catching a bit, “probably the most honest, beautiful time of an animal instinct I’ve known. I was sitting with Jimmy Stewart when they called for lunch and they turned off the set lights. Everyone left. We were playing a scene where we had our shoes off. And we just sat there on the set, put up our feet, bare feet, and we sat there the whole lunch break together with our feet up and next to each other, not saying a single word. Our feet just occasionally touched each other. It was one of those animal times like when an animal lets you rub its neck. It was the most intimate, rewarding time with another human being I’ve ever known. Feet don’t lie.”

    The last time she saw Stewart was when they bumped into each other at an airport. “I said, ‘Jimmy, I wish we could do a movie together.’ And he said, ‘I can’t be a leading man anymore. I don’t want to make movies anymore.’ He’d been away from movies for a while. He said, ‘You know, I walk out my back yard and I can’t remember sometimes why I walk out there.’ I said, ‘I understand that, it happens.’ He said, ‘Yep. Happens. [Pause.] Sure is good seeing you again.’ And I said, ‘You too, Jimmy.’ And gave him a hug.”

    from The Telegraph article, Kim Novak Tells All

    #film  

  • 11 months ago
  • welovejimmy:

Jimmy’s excited about his phone call

    welovejimmy:

    Jimmy’s excited about his phone call

    (via becausethereisntone-deactivated)

    #classic  
    #vintage  
    #celebs  
    #film  

  • 2 years ago
  • Hitchcock directing James Stewart in The Man Who Knew Too Much, 1956

    Hitchcock directing James Stewart in The Man Who Knew Too Much, 1956

    (Source: andykarl, via becausethereisntone-deactivated)

    #film  
    #1950s  
    #1956  

  • 2 years ago
  • "This is the great thing that the movies have…the potential to really press things home visually—they come closer than anything else, the people can see your eyes…they can—I remember we were up in Canada, in 1954, in the mountains shooting a picture called The Far Country. We were havin’ a bawx lunch—the usual terrible bawx lunch—and this old guy came over t’me…nawdded at me. ‘You Stewart?’ ‘Yeah…’ ‘You did a thing in a picture once,’ he said. ‘Can’t remember the name of it—but you were in a room—and you said a poem or something ‘bout fireflies…That was good!’ I knew right away what he meant—that’s all he said—he was talking about a scene in a picture called Come Live with Me that came out in 1941—and he couldn’t remember the title, but that little…tiny thing—didn’t last even a minute—he’d remembered all those years…An’ that’s the thing—that’s the great thing about the movies…After you learn—and if you’re good and Gawd helps ya and you’re lucky enough to have a personality that comes across—then what you’re doing is…you’re giving people little…little, tiny pieces of time…that they never forget."

    Jimmy Stewart, quoted in ‘Who The Hell’s In It’ by Peter Bogdanovich

    (via Sales on Film)


    #film  
    #quote  
    #movies  

  • 2 years ago
  • lucynic83:

Norma Shearer and James Stewart

    lucynic83:

    Norma Shearer and James Stewart

    (via lepetitrene-deactivated20121027)

    #classic  
    #vintage  

  • 3 years ago
    3 years ago
  • Jimmy Stewart - Harvey, 1950

    Jimmy Stewart - Harvey, 1950

    (Source: valentinovamp)

    #Harvey  
    #rabbit  
    #bunny  
    #1950  
    #1950s  
    #film  
    #movies  
    #fifties  

  • 3 years ago
  • oldhollywood:

Cary Grant receiving an Academy Honorary Award in 1970 (online here)
“Years ago, when Cary Grant and Dyan Cannon were getting divorced, a perhaps apocryphal story appeared in the scandal sheets: As an example of Grant’s supposed irrationality, Cannon cited to the judge Cary’s yearly habit of sitting in front of his television and sardonically abusing all the participants. This item, true or not, must have amused nearly everyone in Hollywood, since nearly everyone in Hollywood does pretty much the same thing. 
The funny thing is that from all accounts, when the Academy Awards began in 1939, they were conducted in a similar spirit of irreverence, something that has practically disappeared from the event itself. “They used to have it down at the old Coconut Grove,” Jimmy Stewart told me in the late 70s. “You’d have dinner and alawta drinks - the whole thing was…it was just…it was a party. Nobody took it all that seriously. I mean, it was swell if ya won because your friends were givin’ it to you, but it didn’t mean anything at the bawx office or anything. It was just alawta friends gettin’ together and tellin’ some jokes and gettin’ loaded and givin’ out some little prizes. My gawsh, it was..there was no pressure or anything like that.”
Cary Grant corroborated this to me: ”It was a private affair, you see - no television, no radio, even - just a group of friends giving each other a party. Because, you know, there is something a little embarrassing about all these wealthy people publicly congratulating each other. When it began, we kidded ourselves: ‘All right, Freddie March,’ we’d say, ‘we know you’re making a million dollars - now come up and get your little medal for it!’”
-excerpted from Peter Bogdanovich’s Who the Hell’s In It

    oldhollywood:

    Cary Grant receiving an Academy Honorary Award in 1970 (online here)

    “Years ago, when Cary Grant and Dyan Cannon were getting divorced, a perhaps apocryphal story appeared in the scandal sheets: As an example of Grant’s supposed irrationality, Cannon cited to the judge Cary’s yearly habit of sitting in front of his television and sardonically abusing all the participants. This item, true or not, must have amused nearly everyone in Hollywood, since nearly everyone in Hollywood does pretty much the same thing. 

    The funny thing is that from all accounts, when the Academy Awards began in 1939, they were conducted in a similar spirit of irreverence, something that has practically disappeared from the event itself. “They used to have it down at the old Coconut Grove,” Jimmy Stewart told me in the late 70s. “You’d have dinner and alawta drinks - the whole thing was…it was just…it was a party. Nobody took it all that seriously. I mean, it was swell if ya won because your friends were givin’ it to you, but it didn’t mean anything at the bawx office or anything. It was just alawta friends gettin’ together and tellin’ some jokes and gettin’ loaded and givin’ out some little prizes. My gawsh, it was..there was no pressure or anything like that.”

    Cary Grant corroborated this to me: ”It was a private affair, you see - no television, no radio, even - just a group of friends giving each other a party. Because, you know, there is something a little embarrassing about all these wealthy people publicly congratulating each other. When it began, we kidded ourselves: ‘All right, Freddie March,’ we’d say, ‘we know you’re making a million dollars - now come up and get your little medal for it!’”

    -excerpted from Peter Bogdanovich’s Who the Hell’s In It

    #Oscars  
    #quote  
    #film  
    #classic  

  • 3 years ago